We’re All in This Together: The Cost and Benefits of Rewards

As the holidays approach, we sometimes equate the value of a gift with the level of love and caring we have for a particular person, or as a symbol of the gifts of the Magi during Christmas or the gifts to commemorate the miracle of the oil lamps during Hanukah. In a larger context, it is important for parents and caregivers to understand the real meaning, cost and benefits of giving rewards to children and youth in care.

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We're All in This Together: Making Effective Requests Without Creating A Power Struggle

Teaching your child how to cooperate may mean making some changes in how you ask her to do things. She can't be expected to cooperate if she doesn't know exactly what you want. Sometimes parents complicate things by getting too worked up when asking for help. At other times, requests are too vague or confusing. Keep it simple.  Here are four steps to making an effective request.

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We’re All in This Together- The Value of Encouragement

Encouragement can come in many forms. Sometimes it can be praise – a simple “good job!”  Other times, children need more than a kind word. It may take a hug, a special treat or giving more of your attention by playing a board game, watching a movie together or going to the park. There are hundreds of ways you can encourage a child, which, in turn will improve their self-esteem.

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We’re All in this Together: What to Expect in Kindergarten, 1st and 2nd Grades; Language Arts, Literacy and Math

by Marc Bermann, Recruiter/Trainer

All schools systems have academic standards that provide an important, clear roadmap for learning. In the early stages of language arts and literacy development, children will learn the fundamentals of letter and word recognition; sentence structure and reading comprehension. In the early stages of mathematics development, they will learn counting and comparing numbers (i.e., which is a greater amount?) and basic word problems. To help your child perform in school, it is best to help your child learn at home, as well. Try to create a quiet place for your child to study, and carve out time every day when your child can concentrate. You should also try to sit down with your child at least once a week for 15 to 30 minutes while he or she works on homework. This will keep you informed about what your child is working on, and it will help you be the first to know if your child needs help with specific topics or concepts.

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