What Community Development Can Teach Us About Self-Development

by Yakov Danishefsky, JCFS Community Services Intern

Leadership, at its best, is fueled by a fervent desire for change and the ardent commitment to a dream. But zealotry, whatever its worth, is not leadership. Leadership consultant, Marty Linsky, writes that “Leadership is disappointing your people at a rate they can absorb.” If the leader expresses too much passion, she loses her people. Too little passion, and she loses herself and her cause. Being passionate enough to dedicate your life to social-change advocacy, and yet patient and even-keeled enough to do so successfully, is not simple.

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Tikvah Tips to Survive Holiday Depression

Thanksgiving is supposed to be a time of happiness, warmth, and feeling close to family. But what if you or a loved one, are feeling depressed, isolated and alone? What if you are experiencing grief, a serious disability or terminal illness, and not feeling thankful? Thanksgiving or any holiday can be a reminder of all that is missing in our lives. Tikvah Professional Jewish Chaplains (Rabbis and Cantors with chaplaincy training) are here for you. Spiritual reflection can help you find meaning in suffering. Even if we cannot control the cause, a positive spiritual and emotional response may help us advance our healing and recovery. Tikvah Chaplains offer welcoming, compassionate, easily accessible, spiritual support for Jewish individuals and families, of all ages.

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Monkey See, Monkey Do: How Parents’ Technology Use Influences Their Family

by Tracey Kite LCSW

As a parent, have you ever found yourself looking up from your own smart phone or tablet to tell your child to get off of a screen? Do they call you on it? One of the hardest things about parenting may be that kids learn much more from what parents do than what we say. Parents are active role models for their children, and parents’ attitudes and behaviors around media are a significant influence on a family’s media use habits. In our quest to help our kids be good users of time, how do we think about parents’ screen use?

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Using Medications Safely: Empowering Older Adults

According to a 2014 report from the U.S. Census Bureau, between 2012 and 2050, the United States will experi­ence considerable growth in its older population (the report defined older population as age 65 and older). The baby boomers are largely responsible for this increase as they began turning 65 in 2011. By 2050, the surviving baby boomers will be over the age of 85.

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Grief and the Family: Finding Balance After Loss

BY ELIZABETH COHEN, LCSW, FT, MANAGER, JEWISH HEALING NETWORK AT JCFS, BEREAVEMENT SPECIALIST

Few things impact a family more than the death of one of its members. For many families, the loss of a loved one can lead to a heightening of old conflicts creating stress and strife. At a time of deep pain, family members often feel they cannot turn to each other for solace. But, it is also possible for families to grow together through the experience of loss.

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Dealing with Grief & Loss

BY ROSALIE GREENBERGER, LCSW JEWISH CHILD & FAMILY SERVICES

When a loved one dies, the effects of loss are as varied as our loved ones. Our feelings of grief are influenced by our relationship with the deceased, the circumstances of death and the timing of the death. At times, grief is manageable. We may be sorry that our loved one has died and feel sadness, but overall, the death will not have a large impact on our lives going forward.

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Grief and the Family: Finding Balance after Loss

by Elizabeth Cohen, LCSW, FT, Manager, Jewish Healing Network at JCFS
Bereavement Specialist

Few things impact a family more than the death of one of its members. For many families, the loss of a loved one can lead to a heightening of old conflicts creating stress and strife.  At a time of deep pain, family members often feel they cannot turn to each other for solace. But, it is also possible for families to grow together through the experience of loss.

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Gender Stereotypes – What’s A Parent to Do?

By Tracey Lipsig Kite, LCSW, Educator and Trainer, Jewish Child & Family Services

“Do girls abandon our bodies because that’s where we’re shamed and boys abandon their emotions because that’s where they’re shamed? Little boys: Don’t feel. Little girls: Don’t hunger.” Glennon Doyle Melton in Love Warrior

Our culture today (often unconsciously) pushes girls and boys into separate boxes, and handicaps them emotionally. Despite our efforts to the contrary, we continue to tell girls, in subtle and not-so-subtle ways, that being nice, beautiful, smart and successful are expected; expressing anger is not OK. We tell boys that being tough, strong and a leader are important, and the only emotion that is OK for them to express is anger. To further complicate things, most people aren’t aware of having taken in those messages, so we may be passing them on to our kids without meaning to. Two JCFS parenting sessions of particular interest over the past two years are: Girl Drama and Raising Emotionally Healthy Boys.

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